Just a little bit of positivity: The thin line of difference between body positivity and reality

Generally people my age aren’t that comfortable talking about body sizes or anything of that sort. I don’t understand why, because we all do have insecurities. A few comments made purely for “jovial reasons” and occasional taunts of “You’ve become a bit healthy, had fun in your vacations it seems!”, apart from that, I don’t find body size discussions anywhere.

So straight up, I would begin with myself. I’ve been a fairly chubby child. If I exempt my lean toddler years, however. My mother herself holds her mouth agape as to how exactly this transformation came to be.

I’ve had some real nutritious food, usually “zero trans fat” or “high on fiber” stuff. Binge eating was and never is a practice at home. I did martial arts, yoga and occasional exercising to keep myself fit. I do classify as a healthy person, who is also a bit chubby. I do seem happy about it, because I try to do everything I can, and if it doesn’t change anything, there is nothing much I can do to fix it.

And when it comes to my behavior towards others, there have been some…questionable things. I do encourage body positivity now, but I never did so in my past really immature years. Not saying I’m some mature Buddha now, but I can say I’ve improved.

My gang and I in our classroom used to make stereotypes about an obese girl in our class (I’d refrain from using the word “fat”, because it does seem a bit rude to say that). We used to say things like, “I bet her lunchbox is her size too”. I know, it was a bad thing to say. A few in our class passed a few rude comments about the obese children being equivalent to bulky animals.

Photo by Anthony Shkraba on Pexels.com

Though funny at that time, it must have been very insulting and mentally disturbing for those children. And really, it’s not only the obese ones getting attacked. It’s also those underweight ones, often called “sticks” and taunted with “you’d fly away if a storm came by”.

And what would follow would be probable stressing out to fit into others’ mindset.

That’s when you need body positivity. When you need to feel good in your own skin. And this is not only for body sizes, it’s for your complexion or any other thing that is completely natural. Even being short heighted.

But at the end of the day, deep down, you might know that this is probably not your best self. At the end of the day, being overweight isn’t good for your health, being underweight isn’t good for your health. And this might not give a good outcome in the future.

This is the reality.

You need body positivity when you create a mental impression about how you wish to fit into others’ standards, but you need to think of the reality when it comes to your better health.

Being obese or underweight is a fact that you can work upon, but being “ugly” because of it is an opinion, that you need to change.

(I should get the last two paragraphs framed somewhere, shouldn’t I?)


This post was just me writing down my thoughts roughly. I’ve given this issue a bit of a thought, I realize that body positivity needs to be normalized, while embracing the reality.

Do you have a story to share on this topic? What are your thoughts about feeling insecure in your own skin?

You could mail me about this, and if I do receive a good amount of responses, I would get those stories or viewpoints published on the blog. This is open all the time, meaning there is no time limit. You could have your content published anonymously

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Not-so-daintily loving you,

Divi.

P.S.- Might be a wee bit late in responding to comments! And if you’ve filled the form, let me know in the comments!